Center StageBroadway of BridgesScreenplays & ManuscriptsIntermissionGan Eden Stilla HavetAnne Visual Art Studio
Short Stories by Our OwnPhoto PotpourriZOOPATHE ROUND TABLEONTARIO ROSE CASTINGWonderful World of SPEC
YouTubes by The Lincoln Studio

Your story begins with an idea, a vision we call the silver screen of imagination, very distinct, detailed, almost a hologram. In no other form of writing do we find this so true. Like a director walking on the set amid the thespians and production crew; or sitting in a front row seat watching your cinema in technicolor. To quote Mr.Syd Field from his book Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting,"The job of the screenwriter is to write the (movie) script scene by scene, shot by shot. What is a shot? A shot is the cell, the kernel of action; a shot basically is what the camera sees ... scenes are made up of shots. If you want to write a dialogue scene in a master shot all you need to write i.e. INT. - RESTAURANT - NIGHT and simply let your characters speak without any reference to the camera or shot. Resistance is the urge to do something else. Acknowledge it and forge on"
the fundamentals of basic screenwriting: 
getting started in writing your own movie - the screenplay 
by Richard C. Burriesci a presentation of The Lincoln Studio for the fine arts and film production
LIGHTS ... CAMERA ... ACTION!  
GOLDEN RULES:
YOUR FIRST 10 ... MUST BE A 10!
YOUR FIRST TEN MINUTES (10 PAGES) MUST BE TOTALLY CAPTIVATING  DON'T SAVE YOUR BEST FOR LAST ...
YOU WON'T GET THE CHANCE!
REGARDING YOUR SETS ...
INT. EASIER AND CHEAPER TO PRODUCE THAN EXT. 
(A DIFFERENCE OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS REGARDING WEATHER AND PERMITS)
WORK YOUR McGUFFIN IN FIRST FIVE PAGES 
(SUBPLOTS AND CLUES) click the word McGuffin underlined above for definition
RESEARCH WELL EVENTS & MATERIAL IN YOUR SCRIPT
ACCURACY IS A MUST ... IT MUST BE BELIEVABLE
HOW TO OVERCOME WB (WRITER'S BLOCK):
DISCIPLINE
A)  SET GOAL: TEN PAGES PER DAY NOT NECESSARILY IN SEQUENTIAL ORDER
B)  READ ALOUD WHAT YOU WROTE: THE EAR OFTEN PICKS UP MISTAKES
C)  CONJURE THREE NEW WORDS OR PHRASES EACH DAY TO USE LATER ON IN SCRIPT



PASS & GO
DO NOT DWELL ON ONE PIECE. MOVE ON! JIGSAW PUZZLES ARE DONE IN SEGMENTS. SO, TOO IS YOUR SCREENPLAY. RESISTANCE - ACKNOWLEDGE IT AND FORGE AHEAD!
TIMING
A)  TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. IF YOU DO NOT CUT IT SHORT ... THEY WILL!
B)  MUSIC HELPS TIMING AND FLOW. YOUR FAVORITE SONGS WILL HELP KEEP TIME.
TAKE FIVE: STAY ALIVE
A)  TAKE A REST AND DO SOMETHING ELSE; THEN COME BACK RENEWED
B)  TAKE A POWER NAP AND DREAM A SOLUTION
C)  THE KEY IS THESE THREE: FOCUS - DISCIPLINE - DILIGENCE
CLICK BELOW AND LEARN THE LINGO
IF YOU FOLLOW THE PROPER SCREENPLAY FORMAT ...ONE PAGE TRANSLATES TO SIXTY SECONDS MOVIE TIME
CREATE A TAG LINE TO ATTRACT MOVIE GOERS AND PRODUCERS
what is discipline?
you're a late sleeper and your job calls foryou to be up and ready for action at 6:00a.m. You may hate your work but you arewhere you supposed to be both brighteyed and bushy tailed at 5:45 a.m. ...With a great attitude! 
DEVELOP YOUR CHARACTER
love 'em or hate 'em but don't be indifferent! whether they have one line or the star of your script
RICHARD CHRISTOPHER BURRIESCI - Editor-in-Chief
THE LINCOLN STUDIO
FOR THE FINE ARTS AND FILM PRODUCTION
    ARTIST DIRECTORY

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM AND CREW POSITIONS:
Pre-Production Phase - The Screenplay 
The Screenplay after being Proofread and PA COPYRIGHT in the Library of Congress (performing arts copyright $40.

SCREENWRITERS:
The Screenwriters or scriptwriters are responsible for researching the story, developing the narrative, writing the screenplay, and delivering it, in the required format, to the Producers. They are almost always freelancers who either pitch original ideas to Producers in the hope that they will be optioned or sold, or who are commissioned by a Producer to create a screenplay from a concept, true story, existing screen work or literary work, such as a novel or short story.
EXECUTIVE PRODUCER:
An Executive Producer is usually an investor in the project or someone who has facilitated the funding of the project. There may be multiple executive producers on a project, depending on the financing arrangements. 
PRODUCER:
The producer initiates, coordinates, supervises, and controls matters such as raising funding, hiring key personnel, contracting and arranging for distributors. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the process from development to completion of a project. 
DIRECTOR:
The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of the film's plot, directing the performances of actors, selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film's soundtrack. 
ACTORS AND EXTRAS:
a person whose profession is acting on the stage, in movies, or on television.
Production Phase -
LINE PRODUCER:
Typically, a line producer manages the budget of a film production. Alternatively, or in addition, they may manage the day to day physical aspects of the film production. 
PRODUCTION MANAGER:
The production manager supervises the physical aspects of the production including personnel, technology, budget, and scheduling. It is the PM’s responsibility to make sure the filming stays on schedule and within its budget. The PM often works under the supervision of a line producer and directly supervises the Production Coordinator. 
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR:
The production coordinator is the information nexus of the production, responsible for organising all the logistics from hiring crew, renting equipment, and booking talent.  The PC is an integral part of film production. 
PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT:
Production accountants are responsible for managing finances and maintaining financial records during film production. They work closely with the Producer and the production office to manage the day-to-day accounting office functions, and report on the project’s financial progress against the budgets (cost reporting). 
1st ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: 
The first assistant director (1st AD) assists the production manager and director. They oversee day-to-day management of the cast and crew scheduling, equipment, script, and the set. They ensure the filming comes in on schedule while maintaining a working environment in which the director, principal artists (actors) and crew can be focused on their work. 
2nd ASSISTANT DIRECTOR:
The second assistant director (2nd AD) is the chief assistant of the 1st AD and helps carry out those tasks delegated to the 1st AD. The 2nd AD works closely with the Production Coordinator to create the daily Call Sheets that let the crew know the schedule and details about the shooting day. 
SCRIPT SUPERVISOR:
The Script Supervisor is also known as "continuity", keeps track of what parts of the script have been filmed and makes notes of any deviations between what was actually filmed and what appeared in the script. They make notes on every shot, and keep track of props, blocking, and other details to ensure continuity from shot to shot and scene to scene. 
STUNT COORDINATOR:
Where the film requires a stunt, and involves the use of stunt performers, the stunt coordinator will arrange the casting and performance of the stunt, working closely with the Director. 
LOCATION MANAGER:
The location manager is responsible for finding and securing locations to be used for the production and coordinating the logistics, permits and costs involved. They are also the face of the production to the community . 
DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY (CINEMATOGRAPHER):
The Director of Photography (Cinematographer) is the head of the camera and lighting department of the film. DoP makes decisions on lighting and framing of scenes in conjunction with the film's director. 
CAMERA OPERATOR:
The camera operator operates the camera under the direction of the director of photography, or the film director, to capture the scenes on film. Depending on the camera format being used for filming (eg film or digital), a director of photography may not operate the camera, but sometimes these two roles are combined. 
1st  ASSISTANT CAMERA (FOCUS PULLER):
The first assistant camera (1st AC) is responsible for keeping the camera in focus while it is shooting. 
2nd ASSISTANT CAMERA:
The second assistant camera (2nd AC) operates the clapperboard at the beginning of each take and loads the raw film stock into the camera magazines between takes/oversees the log books that record when the film stock is received, used, and sent to the lab for processing. 
DIGITAL IMAGING TECHNICIAN:
The Digital Imaging Technician (DIT) on digital productions the digital imaging technician is responsible for the coordination of the internal workings of the digital camera. Under the direction of the director of photography, the DIT will make adjustments to the multitude of variables available in most professional digital cameras to manipulate the resulting image. 
PRODUCTION SOUND MIXER:
The production sound mixer is head of the sound department on set, responsible for recording all sound during filming. This involves the choice of microphones, operation of a sound recording device, and sometimes the mixing of audio signals in real time. 
BOOM SWINGER:
The Boom Operator (Boom Swinger) is responsible for microphone placement and movement during filming. The boom operator uses a boom pole to position the mic above or below the actors, just out of the camera's frame. 
KEY GRIP: 
Grips are trained lighting and rigging technicians whose responsibility is to work closely with the electrical department to put in lighting set-ups required for a shot. The key grip is the chief grip on a set, and is the head of the set operations dept. The key grip works with the director of photography and helps set up the set to achieve correct lighting/blocking. 
BEST BOY GRIP:
The best boy grip is chief assistant to the key grip. They are also responsible for organizing the grip truck throughout the day. 
DOLLY GRIP:
The Dolly grip in charge of operating the camera dolly is called the dolly grip. They place, level, and move the dolly track, then push and pull the dolly, and usually a camera operator and camera assistant as riders. 
GAFFER:
The Gaffer is the head of the electrical department, responsible for the design and execution of the lighting plan for a production. The gaffer is often credited as "Chief Lighting Technician". 
PRODUCTION DESIGNER:
The Production Designer is responsible for creating the physical, visual appearance of the film - settings, costumes, props, character makeup. 
ART DIRECTOR:
The Art Director oversees the craft and artists who give form to the production design as it develops. 
SET DESIGNER:
The Set Designer is the draftsman, often an architect, who realizes the structures or interior spaces called for by the production designer. 
The set decorator is in charge of decorating the set, including the furnishings and all the other objects that will be seen in the film.
ILLUSTRATOR:
The illustrator creates visual representations of the designs to communicate the ideas imagined by the production designer.  
PROPS BUILDER:
The Props Builders are technicians skilled in construction, plastics casting, machining & electronics. 
HAIR-MAKE-UP ARTIST & CHOREOGRAPHY:
The Hair and Make-up artists work with makeup, hair, prosthetics and special effects to create the characters look for anyone appearing on screen. Their role is to manipulate an actors on screen appearance. 
​  Post-Production Phase -
FILM EDITOR:
The Film Editor assembles the various shots into a coherent film, working closely with the director.
SOUND DESIGNER:
The Sound Designer controls the post-production sound of a movie. 
He is responsible for assembling and editing all dialogue and sound effects on the soundtrack. 
COMPOSER:
The composer is responsible for writing the musical score for a film. 
FOLEY ARTIST:
Creates and records many of the sound effects for a film. 
ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER:
An entertainment lawyer regularly counsels clients on issues involving a wide range of legal practice areas, including intellectual property, contracts, business, employment/labor, securities, international, taxation, immigration, and litigation.




















THERE'S A VAST DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A COPYRIGHT AND A PATENT IN RELATION TO COST!
@ $100,000.00!
How much does it cost to copyright a song or manuscript (PA) with the Library of Congress?
The short answer is that the cost to formally register a copyright with the Copyright Office is $35. 
The long answer is that $35 is the application fee, but multiple creative works can potentially be protected under one application. For sound recordings you can register one song, or an entire CD full of songs
How much does it cost to get a patent?
The first step in the patent application process is to file a non provisional patent application, which involves paying attorney fees in the range of $5000. to $15,000. or more, depending on the intricacies of the invention. in marketable products, patents can run you up to $100,000. or even more!
How much does it cost to take out a patent?
The filing fee is $130 for a small entity and drawings typically cost $100 to $125 per page, so a high quality provisional patent application for a mechanical or electrical device can typically be prepared and filed for $2,500. to $3,000.
HOW TO WRITE A SCREENPLAY

"HOW ELVIS PRESLEY GOT HIS FAMOUS SNARL!"
TAKEN DIRECTLY FROM THE SCREENPLAY AND BOOK "ONTARIO ROSE"
Copyright 2004 Library of Congress by Richard Christopher Burriesci and Victoria Janyia Dillard
The bus pulls into the Memphis station on the banks of the Mississippi River. Kyle announces that there will be a two hour layover. The Chief and the alien walk to the water to watch the elaborate riverboats. A twelve-year-old boy is singing and playing his guitar. Morning Star and Victoria sit on a soft grassy spot by the riverbank. The boy serenades her with a verse of “CLEMENTINE” while her back is against a tree as the Chief sits Indian-style.

VICTORIA
You sing absolutely beautiful. Don’t you think so, Morning Star?

CHIEF MORNING STAR
I must agree; Do you like to sing?

ELVIS PRESLEY
Every chance I get! I sing in our church choir, I listen to the songs that come out on the radio and someday, I’ll sing to the world. I want to thank you ma’am; where are you from?

VICTORIA
I am from Antares – a planet far, far away.

ELVIS (Asking the chief)
Sir, she IS joking, isn’t she?

CHIEF MORNING STAR
I could not lie. She is in fact from another world. Victoria, it is getting late – we may have missed our bus.

(Victoria gets up and kisses Elvis on the corner of his lip.)


ELVIS
I have never been kissed by a beautiful lady from another world before. I won’t ever wash these lips again!

VICTORIA
Well, I only caught one side. Pretend that side is paralyzed and move the other side like this:

(DEMONSTRATES THE ELVIS SNARL! Elvis, after practicing this a few times gets the knack.)

ELVIS
I think I got it! Whenever I do this … 

(DEMONSTRATES the snarl Elvis is famous for)

I’ll think of the most beautiful woman in the universe who kissed me.. Victoria – is your name?

VICTORIA
Yes it is; Victoria Rose, and who is the young man I’ll be hearing over the air waves soon?

ELVIS (As they are leaving)
Elvis, ma’am – my name is Elvis Aron Presley.


FADE IN: EXT - OUTSIDE THE MEMPHIS GREYHOUND TERMINAL
RICHARD CHRISTOPHER BURRIESCI
VICTORIA JANYIA DILLARD
CHARLTON HESTON 
as Valimar Rex de Antares
MADELEINE STOWE
LEONARD NIMOY
WILLIAM SHATNER
RICARDO MONTALBAN
CRISPIN GLOVER
JASON ALEXANDER
SUSAN LUCCI
DAWN WELLS
ALISON ARNGRIM
as Ontario Rose
BURT REYNOLDS
MORGAN FREEMAN
ELVIS PRESLEY at age 12
ELVIS PRESLEY at age 31
as Cow Face
PATRICK DENNIS SYMES
as Commander Fulton Johns
PAULA HELEN MOON
KEITH VAN ALLEN
SIR DONALD "SPEC" CAMPEN, JR.
SHARON J. BOGNAR
STEVE HURWITZ
ANDREW BREHM
ROBERT SPISA
as Marie Brandy
as Sylvia Rinaldo 
as Major Francis Graymoor
as Corporal Robert Hewlitt 

(newlywed bride on Greyhound bus)
(Day Dream Diner Waitress)
(WWII veteran on Greyhound bus)
as Kyle Kensington
(Greyhound Bus Driver)
as Sergeant Arthur J. Fricano
as Willis Winfield Waters
(Greyhound Ticket Agent)
a contest would determine best ELVIS lookalike
as Arnold J. Heinz (Ontario's Boss)
as Victoria de Antares Rose Montgomery
as Chief Morning Star
as Captain Scott Montgomery
as Evening Star (Navajo Priest)
as Colonel Marshall Alan Cain
as Dr. Linda Ronzoni Burton
as Celeste Montgomery
as Virginia "Ginny" Dillard Rose
FOUR OF THE CHOICE CAST ARE NOW DECEASED AND OTHERS ARE IN VERY POOR HEALTH SINCE MAY 2004. WE HONOR CHARLTON HESTON, RICARDO MONTALBAN AND LEONARD NIMOY AND BURT REYNOLDS WHO HAVE PASSED 
TO READ THE COMPLETE SCREENPLAY SO THAT YOU CAN VISUALIZE THIS MOVIE THEN CLICK THIS ICON
TheLincolnStudio@yahoo.com
DIRECT ALL COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS TO:
The Screenwriters "Choice Cast" for Ontario Rose in their Silver Screen of Imagination:
Headquarters Open to Guests By Appointment Only!
Click this poster to view YouTube on Choice Cast
Once you understand how to create a memorizing TAG LINE that would capture the essence of a motion picture then we have a fun exercise for you! Before I give you this assignment you also need to thoroughly comprehend a sensational synopsis. The second part of this creative undertaking is to come up with your SYNOPSIS. This synopsis is very important because this is what you send out to potential producers known as a QUERY. Okay, let's have fun putting YOU in the EL CID mode the letters stand for EL meaning The and CID meaning Creative Ideas Department. It also helps if you have a friend or two as your advisory board. Ready? I want you to come up with a TAG LINE that best describes who you are that makes you exciting enough to draw positive attention to you from a total stranger. Remember the tag line is only a sentence or two. In our theatrical poster our tag line for ONTARIO ROSE is
THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT HAD A COVERT OPERATION ... LITTLE DID THEY KNOW THE SPACE ALIENS HAD A COVERT OPERATION OF THEIR OWN!
The first part of this exercise is for you and your advisory board write secretly on a piece a paper and you too, what best describes you in a TAG LINE. This will be the raw draft. Next you will compare what YOU wrote and each of your friends will openly explain why they wrote what first came to their mind. Then you and your friends after a productive creative discussion will determine the best tag line using at least two choices. Vote on the overwhelming what says the most about you in the least amount of words. You will do this procedure in determining the most suitable synopsis describing you in the third person. An example of our synopsis for Ontario Rose is: 
THE 1947 UFO CRASH IN ROSWELL, NEW MEXICO WAS NO ACCIDENT! IT WAS A DIVERSION WHERE UPON VICTORIA, THE PREGNANT ALIENT FROM ANTARES, JOURNEYED TO CANADA ASSISTED BY NAVAJO INDIANS WHO WERE CLOSE FRIENDS TO A CAPTAIN IN THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTIES. HER SON, ONTARIO ROSE, WAS BORN ON HIS RANCH. THE CAPTAIN RAISES THE EXTRATERRESTRIAL GENIUS WHILE ONTARIO'S REAL FATHER IS AN ELDERLY PLANETARY FOREFATHER. THEIR HOMESPUN ADVENTURE WITH A TOUCH OF HUMOR UNFOLDS THE STORY OF ALIEN INHABITATION OF EARTH TODAY























MOVIE TAG LINE and SYNOPSIS EXERCISE:
Have Fun Doing This Next Procedure ...
Richard Christopher Burriesci
Victoria Janyia Dillard
Keith Van Allen
Deborah Altizio
Anne Hart Chay
Andrew Brehm
Victoria Janyia Dillard
Paula Helen Moon
Olga Pelegrin
Richard C. Burriesci
Patrick Dennis Symes
Keith Van Allen
Sharon J. Bognar, sag actor
Steve Hurwitz, sag actor
Keith Van Allen, sag actor
Sir Donald "Spec" Campen, Jr., sag actor
Paula Helen Moon
Robert Spisa
Richie Burriesci
Victoria Dillard
Victoria Janyia Dillard
1923-2008
1931-2015
1920-2009
X
X
X
1936-2018
X
CLICK HIS PHOTO
To join SAG, a performer must pay an initiation fee plus the first semi-annual basic dues. The national initiation fee rate is currently $3,000 (initiation fees may be lower in some areas). Annual base dues are $201.96. In addition, work dues are calculated at 1.575 percent of covered earnings up to $500,000..
Screen Actors Guild-Aftra
IS IT WORTH IT TO JOIN THIS PRESTIGIOUS UNION?
In New York City it is virtually impossible to get acting roles in any movie or TV program other than an extra. The competition is plentiful and there are less jobs than film workers and actors. Cliques are common and the few choice roles go to the ""INS" of the circuit.
+
Casting Call  for Ontario Rose Movie click movie poster
Tutorials
Our definition of "the silver screen of imagination" is simply to daydream, dream or visualize in your mind the huge motion picture screen above the theatre stage that movie goers watch as if it was being shown in cinemas. This would be the final production version as the audience sees it not the director's point of view which is behind the scenes.