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Your story begins with an idea, a vision we call the silver screen of imagination, very distinct, detailed, almost a hologram. In no other form of writing do we find this so true. Like a director walking on the set amid the thespians and production crew; or sitting in a front row seat watching your cinema in technicolor. To quote Mr. Syd Field from his book"Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting":"The job of the screenwriter is to write the (movie) script scene by scene, shot by shot. What is a shot? A shot is the cell, the kernel of action; a shot basically is what the camera sees ... scenes are made up of shots. If you want to write a dialogue scene in a master shot all you need to write i.e. INT. - RESTAURANT - NIGHT and simply let your characters speak without any reference to the camera or shot. Resistance is the urge to do something else. Acknowledge it and forge on"
the fundamentals of basic screenwriting: 
getting started in writing your own movie - the screenplay
by Richard C. Burriesci a presentation of The Lincoln Studio and its associates
LIGHTS ... CAMERA ... ACTION!GOLDEN RULES:
YOUR FIRST 10 ... MUST BE A 10!
YOUR FIRST TEN MINUTES (10 PAGES) MUST BE TOTALLY CAPTIVATING
DON'T SAVE YOUR BEST FOR LAST ...YOU WON'T GET THE CHANCE!

REGARDING YOUR SETS ...
INT. EASIER AND CHEAPER TO PRODUCE THAN EXT. 
(A DIFFERENCE OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS REGARDING WEATHER AND PERMITS)

WORK YOURMcGUFFININ FIRST FIVE PAGES (SUBPLOTS AND CLUES)[click the word McGuffin underlined above for definition]

RESEARCH WELL EVENTS & MATERIAL IN YOUR SCRIPT
ACCURACY IS A MUST ... IT MUST BE BELIEVABLE

HOW TO OVERCOME WB (WRITER'S BLOCK):
DISCIPLINE
A)  SET GOAL: TEN PAGES PER DAY NOT NECESSARILY IN SEQUENTIAL ORDER
B)  READ ALOUD WHAT YOU WROTE: THE EAR OFTEN PICKS UP MISTAKES
C)  CONJURE THREE NEW WORDS OR PHRASES EACH DAY TO USE LATER ON IN SCRIPT

PASS & GO
DO NOT DWELL ON ONE PIECE. MOVE ON! JIGSAW PUZZLES ARE DONE IN SEGMENTS. SO, TOO IS YOUR SCREENPLAY. RESISTANCE - ACKNOWLEDGE IT AND FORGE AHEAD!


TIMING
A)  TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. IF YOU DO NOT CUT IT SHORT ... THEY WILL!
B)  MUSIC HELPS TIMING AND FLOW. YOUR FAVORITE SONGS WILL HELP KEEP TIME.

TAKE FIVE: STAY ALIVE
A)  TAKE A REST AND DO SOMETHING ELSE; THEN COME BACK RENEWED
B)  TAKE A POWER NAP AND DREAM A SOLUTION
C)  THE KEY IS THESE THREE: FOCUS - DISCIPLINE - DILIGENCE
CLICK BELOW AND LEARN THE LINGO
IF YOU FOLLOW THE PROPER SCREENPLAY FORMAT ...
ONE PAGE TRANSLATES TO SIXTY SECONDS MOVIE TIME
CREATE A TAG LINE TO ATTRACT MOVIE GOERS AND PRODUCERS
what is discipline?
you're a late sleeper and your job calls foryou to be up and ready for action at 6:00a.m. You may hate your work but you arewhere you supposed to be both brighteyed and bushy tailed at 5:45 a.m. ...With a great attitude! 
YOUR THEATRICAL POSTER WILL HELP KEEP YOU FOCUSED
DESIGN ONE NOW!
with your tag line and synopsis
DEVELOP YOUR CHARACTER
love 'em or hate 'em but don't be indifferent! whether they have one line or the star of your script
FROM THE SCI-FI MOVIE "EARTH VS. THE FLYING SAUCERS"
CLICK THE POSTERS TO WATCH SHORT VIDEO
CLICK EACH THEATRICAL POSTER TO VIEW THE TRAILER FOR THAT PARTICULAR MOVIE
RICHARD CHRISTOPHER BURRIESCI - Editor-in-Chief
THE LINCOLN STUDIO
FOR THE FINE ARTS AND FILM PRODUCTION
    ARTIST DIRECTORY

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM AND CREW POSITIONS:
+ Pre-Production Phase - The Screenplay 
The Screenplay after being Proofread and PA COPYRIGHT in the Library of Congress (performing arts copyright $40.)

SCREENWRITERS:
The Screenwriters or scriptwriters are responsible for researching the story, developing the narrative, writing the screenplay, and delivering it, in the required format, to the Producers. They are almost always freelancers who either pitch original ideas to Producers in the hope that they will be optioned or sold, or who are commissioned by a Producer to create a screenplay from a concept, true story, existing screen work or literary work, such as a novel or short story.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER:
An Executive Producer is usually an investor in the project or someone who has facilitated the funding of the project. There may be multiple executive producers on a project, depending on the financing arrangements. 

PRODUCER:
The producer initiates, coordinates, supervises, and controls matters such as raising funding, hiring key personnel, contracting and arranging for distributors. The producer is involved throughout all phases of the process from development to completion of a project. 

DIRECTOR:
The director is responsible for overseeing the creative aspects of a film, including controlling the content and flow of the film's plot, directing the performances of actors, selecting the locations in which the film will be shot, and managing technical details such as the positioning of cameras, the use of lighting, and the timing and content of the film's soundtrack. 

ACTORS AND EXTRAS:
a person whose profession is acting on the stage, in movies, or on television.

+ Production Phase -

LINE PRODUCER:
Typically, a line producer manages the budget of a film production. Alternatively, or in addition, they may manage the day to day physical aspects of the film production. 

PRODUCTION MANAGER:
The production manager supervises the physical aspects of the production including personnel, technology, budget, and scheduling. It is the PM’s responsibility to make sure the filming stays on schedule and within its budget. The PM often works under the supervision of a line producer and directly supervises the Production Coordinator. 

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR:
The production coordinator is the information nexus of the production, responsible for organising all the logistics from hiring crew, renting equipment, and booking talent.  The PC is an integral part of film production. 

PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT:
Production accountants are responsible for managing finances and maintaining financial records during film production. They work closely with the Producer and the production office to manage the day-to-day accounting office functions, and report on the project’s financial progress against the budgets (cost reporting). 

FIRST ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: 
The first assistant director (1st AD) assists the production manager and director. They oversee day-to-day management of the cast and crew scheduling, equipment, script, and the set. They ensure the filming comes in on schedule while maintaining a working environment in which the director, principal artists (actors) and crew can be focused on their work. 

2nd ASSISTANT DIRECTOR:
The second assistant director (2nd AD) is the chief assistant of the 1st AD and helps carry out those tasks delegated to the 1st AD. The 2nd AD works closely with the Production Coordinator to create the daily Call Sheets that let the crew know the schedule and details about the shooting day. 

SCRIPT SUPERVISOR:
The Script Supervisor is also known as "continuity", keeps track of what parts of the script have been filmed and makes notes of any deviations between what was actually filmed and what appeared in the script. They make notes on every shot, and keep track of props, blocking, and other details to ensure continuity from shot to shot and scene to scene. 

STUNT COORDINATOR:
Where the film requires a stunt, and involves the use of stunt performers, the stunt coordinator will arrange the casting and performance of the stunt, working closely with the Director. 

LOCATION MANAGER:
The location manager is responsible for finding and securing locations to be used for the production and coordinating the logistics, permits and costs involved. They are also the face of the production to the community . 

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY (CINEMATOGRAPHER):
The Director of Photography (Cinematographer) is the head of the camera and lighting department of the film. DoP makes decisions on lighting and framing of scenes in conjunction with the film's director. 

CAMERA OPERATOR:
The camera operator operates the camera under the direction of the director of photography, or the film director, to capture the scenes on film. Depending on the camera format being used for filming (eg film or digital), a director of photography may not operate the camera, but sometimes these two roles are combined. 

FIRST ASSISTANT CAMERA (FOCUS PULLER):
The first assistant camera (1st AC) is responsible for keeping the camera in focus while it is shooting. 

SECOND ASSISTANT CAMERA:
The second assistant camera (2nd AC) operates the clapperboard at the beginning of each take and loads the raw film stock into the camera magazines between takes/oversees the log books that record when the film stock is received, used, and sent to the lab for processing. 

DIGITAL IMAGING TECHNICIAN:
The Digital Imaging Technician (DIT) on digital productions the digital imaging technician is responsible for the coordination of the internal workings of the digital camera. Under the direction of the director of photography, the DIT will make adjustments to the multitude of variables available in most professional digital cameras to manipulate the resulting image. 

PRODUCTION SOUND MIXER:
The production sound mixer is head of the sound department on set, responsible for recording all sound during filming. This involves the choice of microphones, operation of a sound recording device, and sometimes the mixing of audio signals in real time. 

BOOM SWINGER:
The Boom Operator (Boom Swinger) is responsible for microphone placement and movement during filming. The boom operator uses a boom pole to position the mic above or below the actors, just out of the camera's frame. 

KEY GRIP: 
Grips are trained lighting and rigging technicians whose responsibility is to work closely with the electrical department to put in lighting set-ups required for a shot. The key grip is the chief grip on a set, and is the head of the set operations dept. The key grip works with the director of photography and helps set up the set to achieve correct lighting/blocking. 

BEST BOY GRIP:
The best boy grip is chief assistant to the key grip. They are also responsible for organizing the grip truck throughout the day. 

DOLLY GRIP:
The Dolly grip in charge of operating the camera dolly is called the dolly grip. They place, level, and move the dolly track, then push and pull the dolly, and usually a camera operator and camera assistant as riders. 

GAFFER:
The Gaffer is the head of the electrical department, responsible for the design and execution of the lighting plan for a production. The gaffer is often credited as "Chief Lighting Technician". 

PRODUCTION DESIGNER:
The Production Designer is responsible for creating the physical, visual appearance of the film - settings, costumes, props, character makeup. 

ART DIRECTOR:
The Art Director oversees the craft and artists who give form to the production design as it develops. 

SET DESIGNER:
The Set Designer is the draftsman, often an architect, who realizes the structures or interior spaces called for by the production designer. 
The set decorator is in charge of decorating the set, including the furnishings and all the other objects that will be seen in the film.

ILLUSTRATOR:
The illustrator creates visual representations of the designs to communicate the ideas imagined by the production designer.  

PROPS BUILDER:
The Props Builders are technicians skilled in construction, plastics casting, machining & electronics. 

HAIR & MAKE-UP ARTIST:
The Hair and Make-up artists work with makeup, hair, prosthetics and special effects to create the characters look for anyone appearing on screen. Their role is to manipulate an actors on screen appearance. 

+ Post-Production Phase -

FILM EDITOR:
The Film Editor assembles the various shots into a coherent film, working closely with the director.

SOUND DESIGNER:
The Sound Designer controls the post-production sound of a movie. He is responsible for assembling and editing all dialogue and sound effects on the soundtrack. 

COMPOSER:
The composer is responsible for writing the musical score for a film. 

FOLEY ARTIST:
Creates and records many of the sound effects for a film. 

ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER:
An entertainment lawyer regularly counsels clients on issues involving a wide range of legal practice areas, including intellectual property, contracts, business, employment/labor, securities, international, taxation, immigration, and litigation.























HOW TO WRITE A SCREENPLAY
RICHARD CHRISTOPHER BURRIESCI
ANNE HART CHAY
VICTORIA JANYIA DILLARD
DEBORAH ALTIZIO
MATTHEW F. BELLAS
ANDREW BREHM
LOIS BENTON LINDSTROM
PAULA HELEN MOON
PATRICK DENNIS SYMES
JENNIFER LAUREN SMITH
KEITH VAN ALLEN
SIR DONALD O. "SPEC" CAMPEN
CLICK THEIR PHOTO TO GO TO THEIR INDIVIDUAL WEBSITE
TERESA LADOWICZ
SHARON J. BOGNAR
THE LINCOLN STUDIO
for the fine arts and film production
TO ENCOURAGE, PROMOTE AND INSPIRE WHOLESOME CREATIVE WORKS; 
TO REACH ONE'S OPTIMUM POTENTIAL AND GOALS; 
TO TAP INTO HUMAN AND NATURAL RESOURCES SO THAT CREATIVE MINDS CAN FLOURISH.

www.TheLincolnStudio.com    TheLincolnStudio@yahoo.com
                (516) 360-8100    P.O. BOX 771105 - WOODSIDE, NEW YORK 11377
mission statement:
MARY GWENDOLYN GLENN
CLICK THE YODELER TO VIEW ON YOUTUBE "THE ONTARIO ROSE YODEL SONG"
with RICHIE BURRIESCI alone
CLICK THE YODELER TO VIEW ON YOUTUBE "THE ONTARIO ROSE YODEL SONG" with the SCREENWRITERS RICHIE BURRIESCI and VICTORIA DILLARD and with DAVID COLLINS